Ground To Plate
An Organic Adventure

The Garden - Year 2010... Click on any image below for a larger view
The Resurection...

I restarted my organic gardening career in 2010. By the time I got going it was mid to late fall, so what I was doing basically was to get ready for the following year. I decided to make raised beds of sorts and I had a specific plan and layout in mind. But before the year ran out, I had already modified the layout.


The Basic Plan...

The original plan was to make a series of 4’ wide beds with alleyways between them. The 4’ designation is very common because it gives you a 2’ reach into the bed from either side. I was going to use cinder blocks to define the outline and then fill the interior with soil (dirt). The alleys were about 2 ˝ to 3’ wide giving enough space for a lawn mower to pass through. The planting space of the 4 original beds would be about 22’ x 4’ (by the fence), 23’ x 4’, 22’ x 4’, 20’ x 4’ (the 3 front beds). I used the back fence as a starting point for measuring. It cut the property on a slant. That’s about a total area of 22’ x 16’ or 352 sq ft.


The Revised Plan...

The Front View of the Garden Beds But, I got greedy and realized I could use that extra space in the aisles to grow more crops. So I capped the ends and I filled in the aisles as well. That added about 114 sq ft or 22’ x 5’ extra planting space. While that might have sounded good at first, it left me with very little walking room for in between. This photo shows the layout from what I call the front of the plots (shot from the northwest corner of the yard.


But, I Did Plant Garlic...

The Side View of the Garden Beds This other photo shows the same area as shot from the southern portion of the yard. You might notice the strings in the thinner beds over what looks like footprints in the soil. The strings mark out a straight line within each of those beds. Those aren’t footprints. That’s where I dug a hole, planted a garlic clove right under the string, and then filled in the soil. Garlic is typically planted in the fall to be harvested the following summer. The cloves will typically sprout before freezing temperature sets in and then goes dormant during the “deep freeze”. The following spring when the weather begins to warm, the garlic plant wakes up from its slumber and begins to grow again.




Revised: 1/18/2016 9:04:32 PM